What are the Immigration Consequences of a Conviction for a Drug Offense?

If one is not a U.S. Citizen, having a conviction for a drug offense can easily subject that person to removal proceedings.  Naturally, it matters what the offense is.  For example if it is an infraction violation for possession of less than an ounce of marijuance, deportation is not a possibility.  However, for more serious offenses it certainly is.  To read more about the immigration consequences of a conviction for a drug offense, click on the following link – http://www.greghillassociates.com/lawyer-attorney-1885887.html.

What are the Immigration Consequences a Conviction for Shoplifting?

Many people underestimate the immigration consequences of being charged with shoplifting.  This is especially common among immigrants who may have returned all the items that was allegedly stolen and believe that there was no harm to the store. They are then shocked and confused to be charged in court for something that they believe was resolved.  Shoplifting, however, is theft and therefore a crime of moral turpitude.  A conviction can have severe immigration consequenes.  Click on the following link to read about such consequences – http://www.greghillassociates.com/lawyer-attorney-1883745.html.

 

What are the Immigration Consequences a Conviction for Domestic Violence?

Being arrested for domestic violence usually results in bail of $50,000 in Los Angeles County, even if there is no injuries or minor injuries.  To someone who is not a U.S. citizen, this alone can be frightening, as it suggests one may be convicted of a felony. What if the case is reduced to a misdemeanor?  What are the immigration consequences of each of these outcomes?  Click on the following link to read a short article about this –

http://www.greghillassociates.com/lawyer-attorney-1883338.html.

Conviction Related to Sexting Properly Required Sex Offender Registration

In our judicial system, there are few things perhaps so stigmatizing for an individual as having to register for life as a sex offender.  It means every year the person must report to the local police to update his address, or in the case of a sexually violent predator (SVP), every ninety days, for life.  The sexual registration obligation also prohibits the person from living in certain areas near schools and parks.  Such a lifetime requirement is certainly understood if the person has raped multiple people by force, if the person were to even be released from prison.  But how about for “sexting” a picture to someone?  Read a summary of a reported decision that answersed this question by clicking here –

http://www.greghillassociates.com/lawyer-attorney-1880627.html.

What Happens if Police Say I Refused a Breath or Blood Test?

Under California’s implied consent law that applies to anyone with a California driver’s license, one must submit to a breath or blood test if a police officer requests this.  This can be a confusing situation because a motorist may legally refuse to provide a breath sample on the side of the road before being arrested.  However, once arrested, every driver has an obligation to provide a breath or blood sample when asked by police.  What happens if one refuses to submit to such a test?  Click on the link that follows to read a short article explaining the consequences – http://www.greghillassociates.com/lawyer-attorney-1882821.html.

Ticket Thrown Out for Running Red Light Based on Red Light Camera

If you have received a ticket for running a red light (Vehicle Code § 21453(a)) based on a camera at the intersection, it can be an unsettling experience.  After all, most people immediately wonder if the camera was correct and if not, is the ticket with a massive fine really nothing more than a shake down by the city or county?  To read about a driver who successfully challenged the evidnce on the basis of foundation, click on the attached link for a good read about a Beverly Hills ticket that was ruled invalid – http://www.greghillassociates.com/lawyer-attorney-1879879.html.

Conviction for Second Degree Murder by Child Neglect.

Can someone be convicted of murder if they fail to take care of his or her child and the child dies?  What if the parent just did not know any better?  What if the parent fails to take the child for medical attention when he or she should have done so?  Click on the attached link to read an article summarizing a recent published opinion by a judge in a case that involved these questions –http://www.greghillassociates.com/lawyer-attorney-1879459.html.